23 March 2014

On repurposing an old Mac, and how to automatically .pdf and print important emails

When I upgraded from an impeccable and solid but nearly-four-year-old Macbook Pro to a spectacular new Retina model in late 2012, I had every intention of selling the old machine.  But as fine a machine as it was, it was worth only a few hundred dollars, so I decided to repurpose it as a server.

OS X Server is an inexpensive app, available from the Mac App Store for about twenty dollars, which puts some GUI lipstick on conventional UNIX server functionality.  This makes the functionality a little bit easier to use and manage (but, warning, only a little bit).  Out of the box, Server provides a very secure L2TP VPN option, which has proven to be useful as a complement to the slightly less secure PPTP VPN running on my Raspberry Pi.  I have CloudPull running continuously on this machine, backing up my gmail account to the machine's hard disk, and this Mac is also linked to my Dropbox account, so it continuously duplicates my critical work-in-progress from the various machines I use.  From there Time Machine backs everything up to two alternating disks attached to my home's Time Capsule router.  It's all part of my multi-layered, duplicative backup strategy.

Best of all, the machine's desktop is remotely and securely accessible via Screen Sharing.  I moved all my email archives to this machine, and now I can search for old emails easily when traveling by starting Screen Sharing, using Spotlight to search my email stash for keywords, and then paging through the results in Finder using Cover Flow and Quick Look-- a delightful reason to use mail.app in the first place.  It's simply wonderful for an email pack-rat like me.

Meanwhile--quite aside from the topic of this nifty little server--my HP OfficeJet multifunction printer has e-print capability that lets print-jobs be sent via a special email address assigned to the printer.  So for two years I've been trying to configure things so that my travel receipts are automatically printed and waiting for me when I return from business trips.  My typical travel partners are Hertz, Marriott, United Airlines, Southwest Airlines, Uber and the occasional Square-powered taxi.  All of these companies send me receipts via email.  I use a Gmail account for receiving these and also because the marvelous TripIt.com service can scour a Gmail account for travel reservations and automatically put schedule details into my Mac/iPhone calendar.  So cool.

One would think that Gmail's filtering capability would allow email receipts from these companies to be automatically forwarded to the HP printer's e-print address.  A Gmail filter like this should do the job:

Matches: ("southwest airlines confirmation" OR "eticket itinerary" OR "Hertz E-Mail Statement of Charges" OR "thanks for staying" OR (squareup AND "receipt from") OR "Uber ride receipt")
Do this: Forward to xxxxxx@hpeprint.com

...where xxxxx@hpeprint.com is my printer's email address.

Well.  Not so easy.  First, the hpeprint.com service rejects automatic forwards from Gmail with a cryptic error message:

Technical details of permanent failure:
Google tried to deliver your message, but it was rejected by the server for the recipient domain hpeprint.com byonramp02.hpeprint.com. [15.201.184.202].

The error that the other server returned was:
550 5.7.1 Command rejected

So while manually-forwarded emails usually worked, filter-based automatic forwards wouldn't.  Bad enough, but then HP recently morphed hpeprint.com into "hpconnected.com," necessitating a new email address for the printer.  And, after transitioning my account to the new service, the service quit working altogether!  Some quick googling shows that this service is now unreliable at best and totally inoperative for legions of users.

Nothing to count on, then.  But why not implement something similar on my doughty old Macbook Pro?

Here's how to implement e-print functionality on OS X

This should work with any printer.  My objective is to have my travel receipt emails and their attachments automatically printed and filed as .pdfs, but this same technique can be used to automatically print-and-file emails of any sort.  (You don't have to be running your Mac as a server.)

My approach borrows from a host of web posts from folks doing similar things, but many previous examples are now complicated by the new application sandboxing security features introduced in OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion.  The following works with the new ways of doing things and includes a cute twist or two.

The two tools used are AppleScript and Automator, both of which are built-into every Mac.  AppleScript integrates easily into mail.app's rules framework, so incoming emails that meet certain criteria can be processed automatically.  AppleScript scripts can be programmed from raw commands, or the AppleScript engine can mimic user interactions with application GUIs.  Meanwhile, Automator makes automatic printing and filing super-easy.  The combination is very powerful and convenient, and it's all good geeky fun.  (And you can still use any e-print service your printer might support too-- there's nothing mutually-exclusive about this.)

  • First, out of fondness for the TripIt.com service, I receive my emailed receipts to my gmail account.
  • I set up a new free account on the superb GMX.com webmail service for exclusive use for receipt-printing purposes.  There are other ways of doing this, but this works brilliantly.  I've had my eye on GMX.com for a while now and have had a test account there for some months.  It works well in a browser and integrates beautifully with the Mac's mail.app email client.  GMX.com seems a more private and standards-compliant alternative to other webmail vendors, and its spam filtering is effective (perhaps a bit aggressive-- I had to white-list my Gmail and other addresses in it).  GMX.com provides you with a free IMAP account with unlimited email storage; setting up a new account takes perhaps five minutes and requires minimal personal information and no credit-card.  Besides being great for general email purposes, GMX.com is terrific for setting up a specific "print to me" email account.  Good stuff.
  • Once the print-to-me email account was set up on GMX.com and active in mail.app, I set up the Gmail filter to forward incoming receipts to the new print-to-me email.  This just meant replacing the xxxxx@hpeprint.com address in the filter rule above with the new GMX.com address.
  • In mail.app, go to the app's Preferences, then the Rules pane.  Add a rule.  In the Description field, name it something like "Receipt Print".  In the conditions block, one way of doing thing is to select "If [any] of the following conditions are met: [Account] is [gmx account]".  Then, in the Perform the Following Actions field, select Run Applescript, and select Open in Finder.  This will open an AppleScript editor.
  • Paste the following into the AppleScript editor:



  • Note I created a folder called "autoprint" inside my Downloads folder.  The application sandboxing introduced with Mountain Lion limits where apps can write to your disk; Downloads is one of the few places mail.app is now allowed to write without user intervention.  So, create that folder in your Downloads folder.  Inside of that, make another folder called "printed".
  • Edit the hard-coded folder names in my example script (especially the one in quotes towards the end) to match your user name and so forth, minding case.  Then click the compile button at the top of the AppleScript editor, and check for any errors.  When satisfied, save it.  Check that your mail.app rule points to the AppleScript you just made.  (Note that initiating the script's construction from within mail.app ensures that the script is stored within mail.app's own script folder, ~/Library/Application Scripts/com.apple.mail ...another recent security improvement.)
  • If you're running OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion: In System Preferences, click the Accessibility icon and ensure that "Enable access for assistive devices" is checkmarked at the bottom.  This allows the GUI scripting in the script to operate.  See this helpful post for how to do the same thing in OS X 10.9 Mavericks, which grants assistive permissions with per-app granularity for security reasons.
  • Now, load Automator.  Choose "Folder Action".  In the Choose Folder pull-down, select Other, then navigate to select your autoprint folder.  Drag the Print Finder Items action from the column at the left into the workflow.  Then drag the Move Finder Items action under that, and specify that printed items should be moved to the "printed" subfolder you previously placed in your autoprint folder.  Save this new Folder Action you've made.
You're done.  Incoming emails will be split from their attachments.  Any attachments will be given unique names based on the numeric mail ID and original subject, then they will be placed in the autoprint folder.  Meanwhile the body of the email will be converted to .pdf (complete with clickable embedded links!) and also placed in the autoprint folder.  Printing will occur automatically, after which the files will be moved to the printed folder.  A print-success email notification is then sent back to you.  The original emails will remain untouched in mail.app.

So handy for compiling expense reports after a long trip!  You can even snap a photo of paper receipts with your phone as you travel and email them to your print-to-me address.  It's a great way to ensure receipts aren't lost or forgotten.  

The script is easy to modify if you have different needs, too.  Enjoy.


22 February 2014

How to work around the latest Man-In-The-Middle attacks

The ImperialViolet blog has an informative analysis of the just-patched encryption issue that can potentially expose unpatched iOS devices to a man-in-the-middle eavesdropping situation in some circumstances.  Seems Mac users running OS X 10.9 Mavericks should anticipate an update in the next days too…

Do this now: Update your iOS device straightaway, and your Mac when an update comes.  It couldn't be easier: in iOS, go to Settings, click General, and then Software Update.  You'll need to be on WiFi.  The whole process takes 5-7 minutes and temporarily requires a shade over 1GB of free space on your device for scratch storage.

The vulnerability was in an open-source component of iOS (and OS X, and potentially other platforms).  My point is not to make snide assertions about open source— I agree that many eyes make for a more secure product, and the solidity of Linux attests to that.  But it's no panacea, as mistakes can still be made and persist, as this demonstrates ...as does the 14-month-old WebView Android vulnerability that made the news in the past few days.  In this newest case the flaw is very easy to see even if, like me, you’re no expert in C-like languages or encryption.  But somehow it got overlooked, including by the compilers that one would have hoped would have caught such a visible issue.

From what I’ve read, seems the code involved is a fork of the OpenSSL encryption module.  I’ve not yet seen an analysis of whether it may have propagated beyond iOS/OS X.  You can bet that many eyes are looking into that right now.

As I understand it: in this vulnerability, a man-in-the-middle attacker possessing an encryption certificate signed by a trusted Certificate Authority could potentially intercept an encryption handshake between a user and a secure service or website, and under some circumstances the mechanisms that would detect such an attack would be short-circuited, allowing the MITM to eavesdrop or maybe impersonate the remote party.

A Workaround

Patch or no patch, one way around vulnerabilities of this sort is to tunnel past the attacker using a virtual private network that authenticates by some unrelated mechanism.  Typically, once a VPN client is set up on your computer, tablet or phone, you can connect to it most any time, and it establishes an encrypted tunnel and routes some or all your traffic into that tunnel so nearby eavesdroppers can’t make sense of it.

Using a VPN routinely is not a bad idea for those, like me, who frequently rely on public hotspots in hotels, planes and other venues… including in untrustworthy countries.  A bonus is that a VPN also evades firewall blocks for things like Voice-over-Internet and (in some countries) social media.  Of course, one must have their eyes open about the local rules for utilizing such services… It’s one thing if your hotel blocks VoIP to maximize its in-room-phone revenues, but VoIP is flat illegal in many Middle East countries (for example).  Fortunately, if you’re on a VPN, no one between you and your VPN service can detect what you’re doing, at least not easily.

Also, when you’re connected via a VPN, it appears to the services you connect-to that you are connecting from the geographic location of your VPN’s endpoint.  That’s great for accessing your subscriptions to things like Netflix and Hulu when you’re traveling beyond copyright enforcement borders.

Commercial VPN services are plentiful, cheap and easy to use.  It’s also easy to set up your own: Here at Jordan Manor we have three: two (PPTP and ssh-forwarding) running on Linux on a little Raspberry Pi per the instructions at http://unvexed.blogspot.com/2012/08/how-to-set-up-real-encrypted-vpn.html and http://unvexed.blogspot.com/2012/08/how-to-use-raspberry-pi-as-secure-web.html and then a third kind (L2TP) running on an elderly Mac enjoying a second life running OS X Server.

Although some firewall situations block VPNs as well, having a choice of VPNs maximizes the chance one will get through.  And running your own VPN means blocking strategies based on the IP addresses of known commercial VPN services won’t work.  Corollary: if you successfully run your own VPN in a situation where commercial VPNs are routinely blocked, don’t blab about it, and resist the temptation to run “check my IP address” utilities on the web when using your VPN, as these can serve as honeypots that database the IP addresses of likely VPN services, which can result in their being blacklisted.

(Meanwhile, blocking strategies based on the port numbers commonly used by VPN services can sometimes be evaded by routing your VPN through non-standard ports ordinarily utilized for other services less likely to be blocked, though that’s often not possible since port assignments are often baked in the pudding of most operating systems and clients.  Of the three VPN implementations I run here, only the ssh-forwarding approach is amenable to that dodge.)

The takeaway

Just be careful out there, use duplicative layers of security when you can, pay attention to updates and patches for your OS and applications and especially for things that execute code on your machine, like Java and Flash.

Something to watch

One thing worth listening-for in the coming days is the potential impact of this bug on other platforms that might utilize the same open-source code …including the Tor network, as it is OpenSSL based.

31 December 2013

Cryptopocalypse: Can your iPhone be hacked by the NSA?

Today the Intertubes are awash with hysteric headlines like "The NSA Has Crazy Good Backdoor Access to iPhones".  It's quite the pile-on: besides the press' inclination to tear down the tall dog, there's something stunning about the well-regarded security of latter-day iDevices being easily circumvented by shadowy spies in Ft. Meade.

What's missing--as is all too typical--is a close and sober look at what's being disclosed.

Here's what we know from the latest Snowden documents:

The DROPOUTJEEP iPhone exploit requires physical access to the phone, which suggests it’s based on the sort of hard-boot privilege escalation that has animated the cat-and-mouse game of jailbreaking since 2007.  With each generation of hardware and software, old boot-time-access doors are closed by Apple and new ones discovered by jailbreak hackers.  The result has been continuous improvement of device security.

But hardware and iOS advancements now necessitate that all recent jailbreaks require the device filesystem be unencrypted by removing any passcode (and, in the case of the iPhone 5S, the fingerprint authentication).  That offers good likelihood that your recent iPhone or iPad is safe from this exploit if you enable the passcode.

But here’s something interesting that I’m not seeing discussed amid all the hoo-hah.  The source document that’s being splashed all over the Internet is dated 2007:



Specifically, the document datestamp is “20070108”.  It’s unclear if the date format is year-day-month, as is typically seen in the US outside of at least some government and military usage, or the more globally accepted year-month-day.  I’d argue the latter, because the iPhone was released on June 29, 2007.

Either way, the document relates to the very first generation of iPhone, before the filesystem encryption capability was even introduced.  (That came a year later, with iOS 2.)

So, calm down, people.  Enable your passcode.  And know that there are much more probable threats to your rights and privacy than this one.

14 December 2013

Five essential tools for maximizing your digital privacy

I don't quote my own blog posts very often, but a recent article in Slate, "Facebook wants to know why you didn’t publish that status update you started writing," spotlights an issue that caught my attention in the earliest hours of the Snowden revelations.  It's prompted some discussions and then some advice that's worth a post of its own, so here goes.

Some of Snowden's first bombshells included disclosures that US and allied intel agents could monitor users' logins and other activity on the Internet in real time even for encrypted services.  In the aftermath of these leaks, I commented,
The "As-You-Type" claim is a special concern
Webmail services help prevent loss of your work in the event of a disconnect or crash by frequently storing your draft on their server as you compose it.  This blog post, for example, has been saved to Blogger's server automatically many dozens of times as I've worked on it.  Had I typed something incendiary and intemperate about some politician or bureaucrat, that would have been stored as well-- and potentially monitored and inspected if my phrasing (or integrated profile) contained certain keywords or triggers.  This means cloud-based services of a wide variety have the capability of capturing and potentially monitoring your evolving thoughts and phrasing, even if you think better of them before committing the "Send" or "Publish" button.  So, it's bad enough that what you email and say is monitor-able... what you think is also.
So the automatic server-saving of your drafts not only provides crash-proofness but  allows the service you’re using (and any eavesdroppers, hm?) to observe your thought processes and note any evanescent notions that you may have reconsidered and deleted.  Creepy much?

Five essential tools for maximizing privacy

In response to that article, a correspondent asks if his privacy is more assured if he does his drafting in a word-processor on his computer instead.

Well, as should be clear by now, if your drafts are on some server somewhere, they can in theory be accessed and reviewed by corporate or governmental authorities.  It's happened: just ask David Petraeus.  So you might expect that if your drafting and deletions are entirely constrained to files on your local disk then they would remain private.  Unfortunately it's not quite as simple as that in today's connected world.

Basically: your drafts are private if they're on your computer and not benefiting from any sort of cloud storage or backup service, and assuming no entity has installed a key logger or other monitoring tool on your computer, and that no one physically or remotely accesses your machine while your drafts are on it in some accessible form ...which might not be at all obvious.

That last point is an interesting one.  I've lost the citation but recall how some guy was convicted for some terror-related crime in the past couple years based in part on evidence collected from scratch files scattered on his disk by his word processor.  Finding this evidence was possible because he had not encrypted his hard disk, allowing easy forensic analysis of his activities.  The only defense against this sort of forensic analysis (whether by government or other entity) is to encrypt your disk with a strong password; in the US at least there are legal obstacles to forcing you to give your password up even if accused of a crime.  (Biometric authentication is not constitutionally protected.  So if Fifth Amendment protections against self-incrimination are important in your situation, know that anything protected by something like a fingerprint sensor can be opened by the authorities if you're accused of a crime.)

So there are nuances to what one might expect to be a simple answer.  Meanwhile, the only real news in the Slate article referenced above is that stuff you delete from a hosted draft may still have been noted and logged.  And frankly, that shouldn't be news to alert readers by now.

The first essential tool: personal encryption

Let's face it, cloud services are popular because they're useful.  For example, I routinely do my work in files stored in my Dropbox folder.  The benefit to me is that I can access them from anywhere using any of my devices or even a browser on someone else's machine.  This has been very beneficial to me, plus Dropbox keeps versioned backups of my files, so if I whoops something it's easy to return to a previous version.  Dropbox is a wonderful, reliable, non-creepy, secure service I recommend highly and for which I have documented ways to virtually assure the privacy of your files.  (Newer, self-hosted services like OwnCloud or Bittorrent Sync provide capability similar to Dropbox's without third-party involvement, leaving only the transport channel and physical or remote access to one's machines as potential vulnerabilities.)

Of course, were I writing some sort of radical manifesto, keeping my drafts in my Dropbox might not be the best approach for staying under the radar.  Snowden's whistleblowing tells us that agencies of governments friendly and otherwise (and, who knows, some well-resourced corporations or other entities) now regard ordinary encryption as opaque as Saran Wrap.  Though I'm not in the habit of writing manifestos or possessing other dodgy files, there are some aspects of my finances and work where confidentiality is important, and in those situations I perform my own duplicative private encryption, which is less likely to be easily cracked.

So, the first tools to acquire and learn to use are personal encryption utilities.  For those lucky enough to be using a Mac, OS X's built-in ability to create bandwidth-friendly encrypted sparsebundle disk images is a boon.  A helpful reader points out EncFS as another effective, cross-platform tool for bandwidth-conserving file encryption.  For any platform, TrueCrypt provides good capabilities for encrypting files and creating encrypted disk images, although it lacks the sparsebundle capability that's so beneficial for online storage situations.

For me, the benefits of using online services the way I use them outweighs the risks, which I've reduced and mitigated through tools such as these.  Similarly, I use gmail for some of my e-correspondence.  It's a great service.  I recognize that I, the user, am the product, and the service markets me to its customers as a digital dossier collected from my activities, connections, communications and (per the Slate article) thoughts.  Of course, anyone who writes to me c/o my gmail account gets databased, too... an example of how our personal privacy decisions have implications extending beyond the penumbra of our individuality.

The second essential tool: Whole-disk encryption, and password-enable your device

As previously related, I once caught a coworker just as he started poking around on my laptop after he thought I'd left the office.  He was an odd sort of duck, and my immediate thought was that he intended to put something problematic on my machine.  It happens.  In fact, it's the sort of threat that's far more likely than NSA targeting most readers here.

And it's readily addressable: turn on your device's password capabilities, including a screen-saver password or other lock-code that activates when your machine is unattended.  This goes for your smartphone as well as your computer.

But this is just an inconvenience to a determined attacker.  Devices get lost or stolen all the time, and Evil Hotel Maids in some countries can and do access computers left in visitors' rooms to perform espionage on behalf of some state or industrial entity.  The best defense against this is a good whole-disk encryption scheme.  For example, the Mac's FileVault 2 option has been a standard feature of OS X for several generations now, and it is highly effective and efficient.  If your machine's manufacturer offers something of the sort, turn it on.  If not, read some reviews and buy a utility that will do the job.

iPhones and iPads automatically encrypt their file systems when a passcode is turned on-- brilliant.  So, do that.  Recent versions of Android offer something similar.

The third essential tool: Email encryption

Ed Snowden insisted on PGP encryption of email communications, and that's a remarkable endorsement of this free and effective technology.  Its developer, Phil Zimmermann, nearly went to prison for developing it, and then-Sen. Joe Biden made two attempts to sneak wording criminalizing personal encryption into totally unrelated legislation.  It's instructive to ponder why tools that allow individuals to maximize their own privacy have been so controversial for so long... this occurred more than a decade before 9/11.

Today, much of what we do on the Internet is encrypted in transit from your computer to at least the first node in the chain to whatever service you're using.  But that only means eavesdropping is blocked to those lacking the keys, and only while in transit, and only for that hop.  For example, Gmail is very securely handled between your browser and the Gmail servers.  Once there, your emails are stored in plain text.  Worse:
Under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) of 1986, police only need a subpoena, issued without a judge's approval, to read emails that have been opened or that are more than 180 days old.
Meanwhile, the repeated compromises of the public Certificate Authorities suggests any encryption based on CA-managed keys may be vulnerable.

The solution is to heed Snowden's advice and manage your own email encryption for those situations when postcard-class privacy is inadequate.

Setting up PGP takes a little effort and is, unfortunately, still a bit of a geek-fest, but it's worth the effort.  Mac users have it especially easy via the marvelous GPGTools.org toolkit, which integrates brilliantly with Mac's Mail.app.  GPG4Win offers something similar for Windows users.  And all participants in a conversation must have established and exchanged their public keys.  Assuming the participants are trustworthy and careful, this ensures that private discussions remain private.

The fourth essential tool: Back up!

We tend to get worked up about the risks to our data, wealth and privacy from shadowy agencies and sinister corporations, but the greatest risk is the most unavoidable: the eventual failure of our disk drives, including SSDs.  That is a matter of when, not if.

There's only one defense, and that is to maintain current and duplicative backups.  Invest in two USB pocket drives, and back up to them in alternating fashion.  Keep them in different places.  And consider supplementing your local backup strategy with online backup services like Carbonite or my own chosen service, Backblaze.  All offer excellent transport encryption; Backblaze offers a free additional private-encryption capability which further cloaks your stuff on their servers, for a great price.

But if the service happens to back up a draft that you're working on, then there's another example of your drafting-and-deletions hypothetically being accessible to someone with the right access and tools.  But that's many levels lower in terms of exposure than writing your drafts in a gmail/Yahoo/Hotmail composition window, Facebook draft post, Google Docs draft, etc.

The most essential tool: control your own computer

So there are things you can do to improve privacy and increase the chances of flying under the radar of governmental and corporate eavesdroppers and snoops.  Short of staying offline entirely, that can include

  • Carefully selecting (and minimizing) what online services you use and how you use them, 
  • Choosing an operating system that is comparatively secure, 
  • Employing disk, file and transport encryption to increase security, and 
  • Leveraging virtualization, compartmentalization, userspace separations and utilization of separate machines.


That last recommendation is quite important.  We tend to fixate on the shadowy cloak-and-dagger players, and sure: those are sexy threats that make headlines.  But the likelihood most of us will be snared by their tentacles in any meaningful way are small compared to the potential consequences of other dumb things we do.

Top among them: using your company computer for personal purposes.

Just don't.

For starters, it's a great way to get fired.  I've known smart people whose work is legally quite sensitive yet they watch naughty videos, play online games, download warez and do other risky things on their company computers, sometimes even in their normal user accounts.  Dumb, dumb, dumb.  Just ask John Deutch.  (What is it about CIA Directors and their digital idiocy?)  Frankly, if I caught an employee doing that, I'd fire 'em myself just out of intolerance for dumbasses.

So, just don't.  With the cost of terminating employees growing higher every year, IT departments are increasingly tasked with monitoring employee computer usage, documenting offenses useful for knocking down exit demands and defending against termination-related lawsuits.  So keyloggers are routinely installed, screen-snaps are covertly acquired, webcams are snapshotted to capture employee behavior, networking logs are databased... do a bit of searching and you'll find many super-creepy examples out there of employers watching and observing everything their employees and contractors do at the keyboard, and of tools marketed to them for ever deeper surveillance, tools like http://talygen.com/CaptureScreenShot and http://www.oleansoft.com --there are dozens and dozens.

That is a far more present threat to most people than the NSA, or industrial espionage, or the depredations of sneaky social-networking services and ad-platform companies masquerading as cloud service providers.  Solution: Get your own damn laptop or tablet, and lock it down, and keep it in your possession as much as possible, especially when you travel.

And mind your assumptions.  If you think you're safe, you're doing it wrong.

17 November 2013

A Dropboxless Dropbox for extra-secure file sync

Dropbox is great for sharing
files between your machines.
I've used and enthusiastically recommended Dropbox for years: as a costless "virtual thumb drive" for ferrying files between my machines, for sharing files too big to email, and even to host web content.  Great stuff.  I also make a habit of using my Dropbox folder for my current work, so every document I'm working on gets backed-up in real time, in versioned form so I can even return to a previous revision if I whoops something.  I love Dropbox.  It's just an awesome service: sign up at http://db.tt/Me4yRjt and I get a small storage bonus.  

But I have harbored no illusions about the privacy implications of storing stuff in any third-party's cloud, even before the Snowden revelations.  So one of my first blog posts centered on a Mac-centric workaround: use the Mac's magnificent ability to create bandwidth-friendly, encrypted sparsebundle disk images, storing the image in my Dropbox instead of the individual sensitive files.  There's evidently a demand for doing such things, as that post quickly racked up many thousands of hits, has remained at or near the top of Google searches regarding Dropbox security since it was published, and was featured by influential tech commentator Shawn Blanc.

Over time I've kept an eye on the Dropbox market, signing up for (but, frankly, rarely using) alternatives ranging from SugarSync to SkyDrive to SpiderOak.  All are fine services with generous free storage offerings to get you started.  SpiderOak in particular has excellent privacy engineering.  None, however, are both free and open-source (FOSS).  There's SparkleShare, which is FOSS, but it lacks a mobile client, especially for iOS (which I'd need).  Tarsnap and Unison are others, but they're not seamlessly cross-platform and lack a mobile client.  OwnCloud is FOSS but requires a central server-- great for enterprises but overkill for my sync-centric individual's usage.  

All told, I probably have more than 100GB of free storage I don't use, on top of the Dropbox storage that I do use.  

But now there's an alternative that's going to pull at least some of my usage away from Dropbox.  It's Bittorrent Sync, a peer-to-peer implementation of Dropbox-like functionality that syncs stuff between your machines and mobile devices.  It's costless but not yet open-source, though the developers have adopted a never-say-never posture towards FOSS.  

Bittorrent Sync is from the folks who make the excellent uTorrent torrent-management client, and it extends the serverless torrent concept to syncing one's files between machines.  Security seems good (though without open-sourcing, that's a statement of faith) and performance is excellent.  Free clients are offered for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, and for iOS and Android.  Setup is incredibly straightforward: start with your desktop machines, pasting the automatically-generated key from one client to the other to establish encrypted syncing between them; then for your mobile devices, just scan the QR code your desktop installation will present for you, and setup is complete.  Couldn't be easier, and bonus points to the Bittorrent folks for finally finding a good use for QR codes!

Then it just works.  Put a file in a folder on one machine and it will automagically appear on all the others as long as one remains powered-up.  Just like Dropbox, only there's no third-party central server involved.  (And, no web access-- which may be a plus or a minus, depending on your intended usage).  
Sharing is achieved by providing a key code to those with whom you want to share; they plug this into their own Bittorrent Sync client.  Sharing key codes for read/write and read-only are easy to generate, as are one-time keys that expire after 24 hours.  And files are versioned!

Bittorrent Sync shares some attributes with other file-syncing services: Storage folders on your clients are not encrypted, though the transmission of files is.  Syncing across hotel and a few other public networks may be problematic depending on how they're set up (my Mac client set itself to listen on TCP port 26085, which some networks might block).  And there's the pervasive risk of potentially instilling a sense of false confidence that can contribute to oversights of fundamental security and privacy practices, such as 
  • Failing to set up whole-device encryption, 
  • Failing to establish a long passcode on your mobile devices, 
  • Failing to physically secure your devices or lock their screen when you turn away...
As a useful tool for privacy or just plain easy-peasy syncing, color me impressed about Bittorrent Sync.  It works nicely and is as polished as you'd expect from the folks who gave us uTorrent.

UPDATE: Here's an especially informative review.


14 September 2013

The Cryptogasm needs a dose of perspective



Ed Snowden's PRISM revelations and the drip-drip-drip follow-ups by reporters Poitras and Greenwald have people in a windmilling panic.  According to countless op-ed pages and blogs, we can't trust our devices and services for fear the NSA might be accessing them. Going off the grid is suddenly fashionable.  Folks sense the NSA's shadow behind every pillar, its ears pressed to every wall.  Apple introduces a new smartphone with a fingerprint authentication sensor, and instantly the Internet teems with anxiety that somehow the spooks might be able to access it.  (As if one's fingerprints aren't on everything ever touched, starting with their birth certificate!)

Fortunately we have Citeworld to assure us, "[Apple's new fingerprint sensor] detect[s] the ridge and valley pattern of your fingerprint not from the layer of dead skin on the outside of your finger (which a fake finger can easily replicate), but from the living layer of skin under the surface of your finger, using an RF signal. That only works on a live finger; not one that's been severed from your body."

Such good news: you can sleep without fear of cloak-and-cleaver types amputating your digits in the middle of the night to unlock your iPhone.  People actually worry about that sort of thing today...

Strike one misdirected, overblown fear, then.  There are plenty more where that came from.

Because it's not at all clear that the pundits and commentators have the least clue about the true spectrum of threats to us our liberty today.  The NSA's curiosity may well rank among the least of them.

Case in point: within the US it appears you have no Fifth Amendment right to decline to unlock the new iPhone 5S or any other device or lock based on a biometric "passcode," because courts have ruled that fingerprints and other physical attributes of a person do not equate to compelled testimony [cf., http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/09/the-unexpected-result-of-fingerprint-authentication-that-you-cant-take-the-fifth/].  I'm not an attorney, but the Fourth Amendment might not apply either, if previous case law holds for encrypted digital stores [see, for example, http://www.theindianalawyer.com/court-affirms-locked-glove-box-search/PARAMS/article/25155 and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carroll_v._United_States]

So, your choice of authentication mechanism has a far more profound and immediate impact on your Constitutional rights than any encryption-cracking initiative that might exist in the bowels of some three-letter agency.  Yet count the headlines.  It's a fair bet this is the first you've heard of this potentially cataclysmic rupture of your rights*.

See, many true threats are not technological.  And straightforward tools continue to be effective against them in the post-Snowden era.

My point isn't to diminish Snowden's stunning revelations, or the dismay over the surveillance of reporter James Rosen or the AP's phone records, or any of the other Orwellian headlines attesting to a surveillance state that's burst its bounds.  It's just that there are threats, and then there are threats.  NSA is just one, and it's far down the list for most of us.  Certain other countries pose another real and present threat to your digital information and identity; creepy Internet services are another; your business competitors are another; personal rivals and enemies are yet another; if one's spouse turns on them then that'd be yet another...

That last one isn't hyperbole, incidentally.  The first indication a friend of mine had that his wife was turning on him and plotting a harrowing divorce was when he noticed things had been slightly changed on his PC.  Turned out she'd hired a private eye to snoop on him, and the guy had installed keyloggers and other spying software.  Nice.

My point: even a weak password would deter that and many other threats you could plausibly face.  Maybe not the NSA, but c'mon, let's be real, if a drug cured 80% of the diseases it was used on, it would be a miracle drug.  And even weak passwords will stymie 80% of the threats to your digital assets and mine.  Maybe more.  That's not to encourage a sense of false confidence, but it's a very true statement.

Frankly, I first got paranoid about having my computer encrypted when I left my company's office for lunch one day, realized I'd forgotten something, did a U-turn, and walked back into my office to find another employee poking around on my computer.  The guy had always struck me as creepy, and you can bet I password-protected my disk that very day.  With that guy, it wasn't so much what he might have found on my machine as what he might have put on it!  And, again, even the simplest password would have thwarted whatever his intentions were. 

Some correspondents have fretted to me about Google acquiring a quantum computer [http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/06/d-wave-quantum-computer-usc/], feeling it's part of a plot to undermine all encryption.  Well, for one thing it's still unclear if that computer is actually truly quantum or applicable to cypher-breaking.  The thing isn't exactly open-source, and its capabilities remain mysterious even to its makers and might well be leavened by hype.  And Google is stuffed with curious geeks and flush with money, and they fill the place with toys.  This is just one of many such.  Personally, I don't think their intent for this machine is nefarious, and there's simply no way such computers could factor in any meaningful way into the troves of data Snowden's slides suggest are accessible to the NSA-- certainly not for the budgetary numbers Snowden also provided.  But, people worry about these machines, maybe because of their mysteries.  

There is an inverse relationship between our ability to understand events and our tendency to fear them.  

Besides, there is a reason that the government insists on AES 256-bit encryption for securing its own stuff.  If you do the math, it's not meaningfully more secure than 128-bit encryption against today's cracking technology.  The spooks who make such recommendations for the government did so not because 128-bit encryption is insecure but because they were concerned that cracking of encryption through quantum computing might become a reality within the horizon of the secret items in question.  256-bit AES encryption is secure into the far future, but 128-bit is secure into the middle future.  That's good enough for me against my snooping colleague and other foreseeable threats, and 256-bit AES is good enough for anybody, for now.  (You might think that since 256 is 2 x 128, 256-bit encryption would be twice as secure as 128-bit.  No... it goes as a power of 2, so 256-bit encryption is 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 times as secure as 128-bit encryption.)

Unless there's a flaw in the encryption algorithm, which is a remote possibility, in which case you're surely screwed, but only by whoever possesses knowledge of the flaw and has an interest in little you.  It's much more likely that governments (plural) would just acquire the keys used to encrypt, either by theft or by collusion with the companies that hold the keys.  After all, if someone holds the keys, they don't need to crack anything and they don't need a quantum computer.  And, in fact, the certificate authorities who maintain the encryption keys used by websites and internet services have been repeatedly hacked over the past several years.  

So, your encryption is, for all intents and purposes, merely as trustworthy as whoever holds the keys.  The technology is, again, the least of it.

With some tools like PGP, you hold your own keys.  (See the "What to do" section of http://unvexed.blogspot.com/2013/06/what-prism-may-be-and-means.html)  Use them with a strong algorithm like AES-128 and good long password, and you'll cause trouble even for the NSA, most likely.  And you'll thwart lesser enemies, no problem.  And those are numerous.





*Side note: The convenience and security of the iPhone 5S's new biometric sensor are very compelling.  If Fifth Amendment considerations are a concern, one could use a multi-layered approach: Go ahead and lock (and thereby automatically encrypt) your iPhone with its fingerprint sensor, but store sensitive items in their own encrypted form with a passcode type of authentication.  Of course, outside the US the Fourth and Fifth Amendments are moot to begin with.  And then there's at least partial weakening within 100 miles inside any US border or coastline [http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2008/10/aclu-assails-10].  Best not to leave home with anything problematic in your possession, hm?  

28 June 2013

An entirely worthy Google Reader replacement


Replace Google Reader entirely: never depend on an RSS aggregator again

Many Google Reader replacements are available today on the eve of that service's termination.  Two things are required: (1) a service which scans, updates and syncs (aggregates) your RSS feeds, and (2) a viewer application or web-page.  Google Reader provided both functionalities.  Its replacements generally do too.
Sismics offers an unusually crisp, speedy
Google-Reader-like browser interface
and requires no RSS-feed aggregation service

Unfortunately, most RSS aggregation services have come in at around $2 a month.  That's certainly not a lot, and one would hope it'd be enough for them to avoid Google Reader's fate, but it's not free like Google Reader.  

More unfortunately, all that I've reviewed lack Google Reader's ability to email an article or summary directly from the app as Google Reader would allow.  Instead, if there's any email functionality at all, just a link is sent.  Of course, all make it easy to quickly open the source article, followed by composing an email via one's usual cut/paste (or, for Mac users, Safari's wondrous Reader Mode). 


[UPDATE: I just discovered the wondrous inoreader.com.  It imported my 270 Google Reader feeds in about thirty seconds... and it offers emailing of entire RSS-version articles at a click, just like Google Reader!  Based on my brief usage of it, I'd say it's the best of the Google Reader lookalikes.]

My first attempt at replacing Google Reader was spin up a little open-source service called Selfoss on my own server, an original-issue $35 Raspberry Pi card.  A bit of effort and patience is required to install it, and users with many dozens of RSS feeds should not update them too often lest they overburden their Pi (installing on a "real" server would address that, of course).  But selfoss presents an unusually pretty interface in the user's browser and provides all the functionality of Google Reader except that email function, which apparently only Google Reader inoreader.com provides.  

And though I'm happy with how selfoss runs on my Raspberry Pi, I've continued to watch the RSS-reader landscape sprout like forest mushrooms after a rain.  

And here, finally, is an unusual one: Sismics Reader, which runs entirely on your laptop or desktop computer ...or which can be deployed on a server if you wish.  

That's right-- it can do its own scan-and-update right on your PC, no external aggregation service required.  

And since you're not dependent on an aggregation service, there's no chance your service will abruptly die if the service goes the way of Google Reader.

Sismics Reader supports Windows, Mac OS X and Linux and installs in a blink.  When installed on your computer, you just browse to the application's specified address and poof: up comes your feeds.

It's about as full-featured as anything I've tried so far (save that lamented email function!) and has the great advantage of being available when you are offline, such as on an airplane with your laptop.  That's very cool.  

Its look and feel is very similar to Google Reader's.  That means it's not quite as pretty as Selfoss but is entirely functional.  And since it resides entirely on your machine, it is ultra-responsive.

It's free and open-source.  Give it a try.  It will import your Google RSS feed list (which you should be sure to download to a safe place before the service terminates -- see Mashable's friendly how-to for that).  

It's amazingly fast.

Potential drawbacks:  
  • It's Java-based, but I have Java on my laptop for other reasons so that's no big issue for me.  If you need Java, you can download it free from https://www.java.com/en/ --if you're not sure if you have Java or not, you can run a quick test at https://www.java.com/en/download/installed.jsp  Do be aware that Java has had more than its share of vulnerabilities in recent months.  Keep it updated.
  • If you enjoy browsing your RSS feeds on your iDevice or other smartphone or tablet, you'll have to install Sismics on a server; it provides a nice mobile-browser interface.  But then you'll be able to get at it only when you're online.

I'd be interested in others' opinions too... leave a comment!